Archived entries for Browsers

How to Use YUI Grids for Fluid CSS Page Layout

For those of you not reading 24ways each day this month, allow me to point out that I wrote a tutorial for it that’s live right now. It’s called Intricate Fluid Layouts in Three Easy Steps, and teaches you how to build CSS layouts that work on all modern browsers effortlessly using YUI Grids. Enjoy!

Also, I suppose I should let you know that I’m flying out on a redeye flight tonight to start my winter holiday. I hope to write once more before shuttering things, but if I don’t get a chance let me be among the first to wish you a very happy new year.

Web Site Optimization – Part 1

Over on the YUI Blog, Tenni Theurer has just posted part 1 in a series sharing what we’ve found by researching web site optimization. At conferences over the last six months I’ve given hints about some of our research findings, and told you there were more to come, and so I’m especially happy to finally have something to show. The #1 rule of better performance is to reduce HTTP requests. We’ll talk about how and why in future posts, but for now head over and read her first installment:

Performance Research, Part 1: What the 80/20 Rule Tells Us about Reducing HTTP Requests

Dave Hyatt on the FOUC Problem

I read anything Dave Hyatt writes. He’s a smart and influential guy in the world of browsers. He was key at Gecko for many years, and now heads up the Safari team. (I’m not sure if this is how his resume/CV lists it, but it’s how I think of him.) He posted late this past Friday night about the Flash Of Unstyled Content problem.

(FOUC = “This situation occurs whenever a Web browser ends up showing your Web page’s content without having any style information yet.”).

He’s thinking about it from a browser perspective. Should the browser pause parsing while style info is processed and calculated? Shoud it pass incorrect values to curious scripts, or bottleneck everything until correct values are illuminated?

Here’s the post: The FOUC Problem. Here’s another classic from him: Testing Page Load Speed.

Cingular? The Cingular 8125?

I’m getting pretty close to buying the Cingular 8125 cell phone, and, in the process, switching from Sprint to Cingular. Advice or input?

The whole world of “Mobile” is about to get much much more exciting in the US in the next 18 months, and I’d like to be with a carrier and on a device that lets me experiement with as much of it as possible. Is this the carries, the device?

I’m moving from an old Treo (the 600), so it’s also a switch from Palm OS to Windows. Any words of advice in that regard?

XHTML News: “Role Attribute” and “2.0″ Working Drafts

Two interesting pieces of XHTML news this week. Yesterday the Working Draft for the XHTML Role Attribute was released, and today the eighth public Working Draft of XHTML 2.0 was released.

XHTML 2.0 is clearly important, but I’m especially interested in the Role Attribute because this first public working draft comes out of the excellent Accessible DHTML work contributed to the W3C by IMB, and already functional in Firefix > 1.5.x. Here are the blurbs for each:

XHTML 2.0: Working Draft

2006-07-26: The HTML Working Group has released the eighth public Working Draft of XHTML™ 2.0. A general purpose markup language without presentation elements, XHTML 2 is designed for representing documents for a wide range of purposes across the Web. See the introduction for the differences between XHTML versions 1 and 2. Much of XHTML 2 works in existing browsers. The draft includes an implementation in RELAX NG with DTD and XML Schema implementations to follow. Visit the HTML home page. (Permalink)

XHTML Role Attribute Module: Working Draft

2006-07-25: The HTML Working Group has released the First Public Working Draft of the XHTML Role Attribute Module to provide the ability to integrate the role attribute into any markup language based on XHTML Modularization 1.1. Developed in conjunction with the accessibility community and other groups, the document is the first of a series of XHTML modules designed to help extend the scope of XHTML-family markup languages into new environments. Visit the HTML home page. (Permalink)

Tip: Disable PDF Display in Firefox (Use Reader Instead)

Erik Bruchez on the XForms Everywhere blog walks through the steps necessary to make pdf files open in your dedicated pdf viewer instead of in Firefox. He also does a nice job summarizing why you’d want to do this:

  • The Adobe Acrobat Reader plugin, like any Adobe application, takes ages to start. While it is starting, your browser is frozen and you can’t do anything else.

  • When it doesn’t work, it crashes your entire browser, or just freezes it (the case with Adobe Acrobat 6.0 and Firefox).

  • When it works, usual browser shortcuts don’t work, including those to close your window or tab, navigate between tabs, go back and forward, etc.

  • To make things worse, there is really no reliable warning when you follow a hyperlink that you are going to open a PDF file. So you hang, crash or freeze without any courtesy notice.



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