Archived entries for Engineering

Announcing: Nate’s Job List

It’s because I’m busy and lazy that I’m announcing this new “one-to-many” channel. Though I truly want to help all my friends, colleagues, and contacts hook up [employment], I unfortunately don’t have time for personalized matchmaking.

My new list, perfect if you’re looking for employees or employers, is a newsletter not a message board. This means you can all subscribe but I’ll be the only one posting. I’ll post to it every time I get questions like these, which lately has been frequently:

  • Can you introduce me to good web developers looking for work?
  • Know a good visual designer?
  • Know anybody that matches this job description?
  • I’m looking to switch employers, who’s hiring?
  • I’m looking for freelance work, know any cool projects?

So, if you’re looking for work or workers, sign up for the list either online or by sending an email to nates-job-list-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

Unless explicitly instructed otherwise, I’ll strip contact info from offers before posting them to the list. This will protect the innocent and allow for quality control while cutting down spam.

If you are interested in a job or person that I’ve posted to the list, send me an email (at my-firstname at my-lastname dot com) and I’ll put you in contact with the potential employee or employer. Please take a moment to ensure you’re sending me something useful and user-friendly (remember: I’m lazy!). Best case scenario: I can just forward your email without modification. Therefore, include a cover letter, url to your resume or job listing, any tracking info (such as the unique identifier for the job), etc.

I hope this is a good system, and better than spamming my blog with all the postings. Feedback very welcome.

Thanks,
Nate

Dave Hyatt on the FOUC Problem

I read anything Dave Hyatt writes. He’s a smart and influential guy in the world of browsers. He was key at Gecko for many years, and now heads up the Safari team. (I’m not sure if this is how his resume/CV lists it, but it’s how I think of him.) He posted late this past Friday night about the Flash Of Unstyled Content problem.

(FOUC = “This situation occurs whenever a Web browser ends up showing your Web page’s content without having any style information yet.”).

He’s thinking about it from a browser perspective. Should the browser pause parsing while style info is processed and calculated? Shoud it pass incorrect values to curious scripts, or bottleneck everything until correct values are illuminated?

Here’s the post: The FOUC Problem. Here’s another classic from him: Testing Page Load Speed.

Open Source for Web Services?

Tim O’Reilly wrote this[1] last week that Open Source Licenses are Obsolete. He points out that the excitement (or at least the newness) today is largely about web services. (Note the term “services”, not “software”.)

To these “services”, a license that deals almost exclusively with installed software doesn’t mean much. The software distributed under these various open-source licenses isn’t obsolete (in fact, I work on some fulltime), but rather these installation-based licenses aren’t sufficient or appropriate when “software as services” are concerned.

Granting somebody the rights to modify the source code behind the Yahoo! Term Extractor web service doesn’t make any sense. Instead, we need a way to license the service: How much capacity is provided? How much uptime is granted? What types of uses are legit? Etc.

This question that he’s raising makes good sense to me. I’ve got friends at agencies and startups that I encourage to use our extensive web service offerings. They want to (and do), but they have legitimate and real questions that a discussion like the one Tim’s provoking could begin to answer.

[1] I gotta get better about not losing things in the draft folder.

Monthly YUI Roadmap Update — August 2006

(Note: The information I’m reprinting here was originally sent to the ydn-javascript mailing list, which is the primary support forum for the YUI Library.)

The 0.11 release last month brought with it the Logger Control and a host of other improvements to the library, including dramatically improved performance in the Drag and Drop Utility, file upload in Connection Manager, and color animations in the Animation Utility.

Beyond 0.11, the roadmap continues to hold to the course we’ve published in earlier updates. The best of our current thinking with respect to the next two release windows is digested below. The pipeline continues to include the Tab Control, the History Utility, and the Button control, all scheduled for the 0.12 release. For releases beyond 0.12, we have some early explorations underway; of these, the project we’re committed to getting on the roadmap is a table control, something we regard as crucial to any complete library and something we’re excited to add to YUI.

Next two release windows for YUI Library Beta:

  1. August 21 (v. 0.11.3) — this will be a bug-fix update, addressing 0.11-release bugs in a variety of components.
  2. Early October (v. 0.12)

Projects in Developmen

  1. Tab Control

    The Tab Control will provide support for a variety of tabbed-module implementations.

    Projected Release: 0.12

    Confidence: High

  2. Button Control

    The Button Control will enable the deployment buttons with (1) diverse visual treatments (e.g., with or without images); (2) configurable actions (clicking can be tied to form submission or other custom functions); (3) integrated menus and submenus.

    Projected Release: 0.12

    Confidence: Medium

  3. History Utility

    Managing the browser’s history stack is critical to the creation of applications that are intuitive, usable, and sharable. Currently, management of the History stack in applications based on YUI requires you to roll your own solution. The History Utility will help facilitate this process by providing a simple interface for adding application states to the History stack during asynchronous interaction flows

    Projected Release: After 0.12

    Confidence: We continue to investigate actively the best approach to this problem across the A-Grade. We are pushing this back beyond 0.12 at this point based on what we’ve learned so far.

  4. Table Control

    Dynamic tabular data controls are a common interactive treatment for data-intensive interfaces, going beyond simple table functionality to add features like dynamic sorting, editing-in-place, resizable columns, and more

    Projected Release: After 0.12

    Confidence: Medium

  5. Note: This roadmap projects our plans over the next quarter or so; in so doing, it makes assumptions about conditions that are naturally dynamic. Some of the projects detailed here may be delivered earlier or later than we are currently expecting; some may not be delivered at all. Other projects not listed here may be escalated during this period. Use this document only as a rough guide; never rely on unreleased code listed here for any crucial needs.

    Regards,
    Eric

    ______________________________________________
    Eric Miraglia
    Yahoo! Presentation Platform Engineering

XHTML News: “Role Attribute” and “2.0″ Working Drafts

Two interesting pieces of XHTML news this week. Yesterday the Working Draft for the XHTML Role Attribute was released, and today the eighth public Working Draft of XHTML 2.0 was released.

XHTML 2.0 is clearly important, but I’m especially interested in the Role Attribute because this first public working draft comes out of the excellent Accessible DHTML work contributed to the W3C by IMB, and already functional in Firefix > 1.5.x. Here are the blurbs for each:

XHTML 2.0: Working Draft

2006-07-26: The HTML Working Group has released the eighth public Working Draft of XHTML™ 2.0. A general purpose markup language without presentation elements, XHTML 2 is designed for representing documents for a wide range of purposes across the Web. See the introduction for the differences between XHTML versions 1 and 2. Much of XHTML 2 works in existing browsers. The draft includes an implementation in RELAX NG with DTD and XML Schema implementations to follow. Visit the HTML home page. (Permalink)

XHTML Role Attribute Module: Working Draft

2006-07-25: The HTML Working Group has released the First Public Working Draft of the XHTML Role Attribute Module to provide the ability to integrate the role attribute into any markup language based on XHTML Modularization 1.1. Developed in conjunction with the accessibility community and other groups, the document is the first of a series of XHTML modules designed to help extend the scope of XHTML-family markup languages into new environments. Visit the HTML home page. (Permalink)

Outstanding Video on Global Development from TED Conference

I was just catching up on some blog reading, and came cross this sentence on Christina Wodtke’s blog: “When several smart people email you and say ‘watch this’ you watch that: Hans Rosling on TED Talks“. She’s right, it puts complex and often-oversimplified issues in a new and illustrative light. It’s good stuff to have seen as you think about the development of our world, and what progress might really mean. Here’s the blurb from the site:

Hans Rosling is professor of international health at Sweden’s world-renowned Karolinska Institute, and founder of Gapminder, a non-profit that brings vital global data to life. With the drama and urgency of a sportscaster, he debunks a few myths about the “developing” world. (Recorded February, 2006 in Monterey, CA.)

The Technology Entertainment Design Conference, or TED, is where this was shot, and is a annual conference in Monterey, CA, self described as “a global community of remarkable people and remarkable ideas”.



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