Archived entries for Talks

YSlow, a Web Performance Plugin for Firebug, Release by Yahoo!

I let the cat out of the bag about the forthcoming YSlow plugin for Firebug during my @media presentation (High Performance Web Sites) last month. But the wait is finally over and I’m happy to let you know that Steve Souders, Yahoo!’s Chief Performance Yahoo! (and the guy who’s data I used in my presentation), made the announcement during his session at OSCon yesterday.

YSlow has three main views: Performance, Stats, and Components. Performance view scores the page against each performance rule, generates an overall YSlow grade for the page, and lists specific recommendations for making the page faster. Stats view summarizes the total page weight, cookie size, and HTTP request count. Components view lists each component (image, stylesheet, script, Flash object, etc.) in the page along with HTTP information relevant to page load times. It also contains several tools including [Douglas Crockford's] JSLint.

Give YSlow a try, your users will thank you. And for more about performance, check out the Exceptional Performance section on the Yahoo! Developer Network.

“High Performance Web Sites” at the @media 2007 Conference in London

Opening slide of the presentation

photo by Amnemona

I’ve uploaded the slides from my High Performance Web Sites presentation at the @media conference in London last week. They are available in PDF format (3mb) as well as in PowerPoint format (25mb) as delivered.

Please note an important change: In Steve Souders and Tenni Theurer’s original three-hour presentation (which I remixed into a hour-long session for @media), and in the forthcoming O’Reilly book, “High Performance Web Sites,” there are 14 rules for faster web sites. My talk offered 12 due to time constraints. In the interest of consistency I added the two missing rules to my slides before posting them. The added rules are #12: Remove duplicate scripts; and #14: Keep Ajax cacheable and small. With these restored the numbering used in my slides will match the numbering in the longer workshop and in the book. (The new rules are #12 and #14; the dozen rules I presented have their same numbers except for #12 which became #13.)

I’d like to thank Steve and Tenni and the entire Exception Performance Team at Yahoo! for letting me bring this important content to the @media audience. Thanks also to Patrick Griffiths and the @media staff for the invitation to speak, all their help, and a great conference across the board. Most importantly I’d like to thank my wonderful audience for their time and attention, for our good round of Q&A, and for the feedback already posted on blogs across the web. Thank you.

I hope to see you all again soon. (Maybe at Hackday this weekend?)

Speaking in Singapore

I’m scheduled to present two sessions at the upcoming Webinale conference in Singapore on April 23rd and 24th.

More details soon, but wanted to give you advance notice.

YUI Party

I blogged this over on the YUIBlog last week (You’re Invited: YUI First Year Party), but figured I’d quickly post a notice here too in case you missed it. There are still a few dozen RSVP slots open, but they probably won’t last long.

If you’re interested in giving a quick five minute demo of something you’ve build with YUI, let me know…

See you there.

teaching the machine

A video called “Web 2.0 … The Machine is Us/ing Us” is an engaging and enjoyable 4.5 minute non-verbal documentary taking us from ‘pencil’ to ‘Web 2.0′. It adds context to the advances that got us here, and suggests what might yet be in store. At about 03:40, highlights from an August 2005 Wired article, “We Are the Web,” are used to suggest that we are “teaching the machine.” I’m afraid that that notion is still inadequately understood and appreciated.

Perhaps the so-called “social web” isn’t about connecting people (not about helping people socialize), but about information conservation: If a person chooses to do something — no matter how small — it’s inherently interesting, precious, and valuable. We’ve barely started to figure out what to do with this second-generation information. Where we have it’s been exciting, useful, and successful: Flickr’s Interestingness and Clusters, the notion of “watching” on Upcoming, the newer “people who looked at this ultimately bought that” in Amazon, and of course Google’s PageRank. The idea isn’t new, but it’s still under appreciated.

Here’s the paragraph from Wired that surrounds the words used in the video:

And who will write the software that makes this contraption useful and productive? We will. In fact, we’re already doing it, each of us, every day. When we post and then tag pictures on the community photo album Flickr, we are teaching the Machine to give names to images. The thickening links between caption and picture form a neural net that can learn. Think of the 100 billion times per day humans click on a Web page as a way of teaching the Machine what we think is important. Each time we forge a link between words, we teach it an idea. Wikipedia encourages its citizen authors to link each fact in an article to a reference citation. Over time, a Wikipedia article becomes totally underlined in blue as ideas are cross-referenced. That massive cross-referencing is how brains think and remember. It is how neural nets answer questions. It is how our global skin of neurons will adapt autonomously and acquire a higher level of knowledge.

Here’s the video, which was created by Michael Wesch, Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Kansas State University:

(via via)

Web Builder 2.0 Slides

I’m back in my suite at Ceasar’s in Vegas, having just finished presenting my third of three talks at the Web Builder 2.0 conference. Yesterday I presented two talks: my Accessible DHTML talk, and my Yahoo! vs. Yahoo! DHTML Case Studies talk. Today I presented a new talk titled Inside the Yahoo! User Interface (YUI) Library. All three seemed well received, and it was an honor to have a packed room for each. I met lots of great people, and am looking forward to following up with all the new people I met. (Please drop me a note if I didn’t get your email address!)

The Yahoo! User Interface (YUI) Library

This talk was in four parts: Why we build it; What we built; Why we gave it away; Why you might like using it.

Accessible DHTML

What are some techniques for making modern web interfaces accessible?

Yahoo! vs. Yahoo! – Case Studies of Three Mainstream, Large-Scale Ajax/DHTML Implementations

How do you manage complex object/event interfaces? Memory Management? Data Transportation? Etc.



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