Archived entries for Yahoo!

Upcoming Speaking Gigs at @media on June 16th and WebVisions on July 21st

I’m excited to be speaking at two great conferences this summer. On June 16th I’ll be speaking at the @media 2006 conference in London, and on July 21st I’ll be making a return to the WebVisions conference in Portland, Oregon. If you’re not already planning to attend, allow me to extend an invitation to both events. If you will be there, please shoot me a message [nate at koechley dot com] or drop a comment.

I’m preparing a unique talk for each conference, so you’ll have to come to both to hear it all. I’m wearing my Developer hat in London, and my Designer hat in Portland. For the more technical talk, I will discuss DHTML and Ajax best practices under the title Yahoo! vs. Yahoo!. Three cutting-edge Yahoo! products will be case studies as I share best practices and highlight the importance of weighing key application attributes when you make technical architecture decisions. In Portland I will discuss Usability for Rich Internet Applications. I’ll be describing and sharing communication instruments and toolkits that have proved helpful to us as we strive to bring desktop richness online.

Both these events are top notch, and I’m humbled to be a part of them. WebVisions is the perfect blend of design, technology and business, attracts an amazing and varied array of speakers and attendees, and in its sixth year is firing on all cylinders. I missed last year, and am happy to be back (plus, Portland is georgeous in the summer). @media is only in its second year but already the premier web design conference in Europe. When I look at the design and development books on my desk, nearly all the authors will be presenting during @media’s two packed days.

Here’s a bit more information on each of the conferences:

WebVisions

WebVisions explores the future of design, content creation, user experience and business strategy to uncover the trends and agents of change that will shatter your assumptions about the Web. Be ready to network, share ideas and be inspired by an all-star lineup of speakers.

Over the past six years, we’ve built a loyal audience of designers, developers and industry leaders. I invite you to join us for an event that’s seen as “the creative conference for the Web.”

@media 2006

The @media conference returns to London on 15th-16th June, bigger and better than before. It’s the event of the year for anyone interested in learning about and discussing the latest approaches to web design with some of the world’s most highly respected experts.

See you there!

New stuff from Yahoo! Developer Network

Blatent plug for work stuff here: I wanted you, my readers, to be amongst the first to hear that we’ve just released lots of new and improved stuff this evening. These three blog posts on yuiblog.com will get you started:

Now you’re ready to head over to YDN for all the details:

Two other things to point out. First, we’ve included CSS packages in this release for the first time, specifically CSS Grids, CSS Fonts and CSS Reset. The second thing, beyond the cool code and design stuff, is that we’ve moved our code distribution and public bug tracking to SourceForge. This will, I believe, be an important step forward for us. Check it all out and let me know what you think.

Maker Faire this weekend!

The first Maker Faire is this weekend:

Join the creators of MAKE magazine, the MythBusters, and thousands of tech DIY enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, science clubs, students, and authors at MAKE’s first ever Maker Faire! Browse the complete online program!

Opera 9b Released on Earth Day

What is the significance of the brand-new Opera 9 beta being released on Earth Day? Probably nothing. It’s just that I wanted an excuse to point to the Opera 9b release as well as earth.yahoo.com.

My First Interview for a Podcast

I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Dustin Diaz for the sixth episode of his podcast series. It was my first time appearing on a podcast, though I’ve since given another interview for a second podcast (that hasn’t been published yet).

We primarily talked about my Graded Browser Support article, but also touched on other aspects of the Yahoo! User Interface Libary and web development in general. Each podcast Dustin does gets better and better (and I hope I didn’t break that trend — though I’ll let you be the judge of that).

Shoot me a note or leave a comment if you’d like to discuss general web development, the Graded Browser Support article and chart, CSS and DOM Scripting, the Yahoo! Developer Network, the Yahoo! User Interface Blog, or the recently-released Yahoo! User Interface Library on your podcast.

Accessible DHTML presentation at CSUN this week

It’s been so busy lately, both professionally and socially, that I haven’t been putting any time into this blog. I’m sorry about that, and have lots of ideas swirling around in my head that I hope to be able to write here soon.

In the near term though, I wanted to let you know that I’ll be in LA this Thurday presenting a paper at the CSUN accessibility conference. The paper/presentation, co-authored by my colleage Victor Tsaran, has the long title, “Yahoo! Experiences with Accessibility, DHTML, and Ajax in Rich Internet Applications”. The 45 minute talk will review the current state of web development and then offer three families of techniques for making the DHTML development that’s at the heart of Web 2.0 accessible to all users.

It’s an interesting and important topic. From 1999 thru 2004 the web became increasingly accessible with the broad adoption of Web Standards and related modern methodologies. Since 2005, these gains have been under pressure as we all race to push the limits of what’s achievable with DHTML in capable and modern browsers. While it is a myth that DHTML is not accessible, in practice the rush jobs and rapid innovations of the day often leave accessibility as but an afterthought. Additionally, as mouse-based desktop interactions — drag and drop for example — become more commonplace online, it’s tempting to exclusively rely on mouse-based input and manipulation which is a cause of concern to the accessibility community (and keyboard-loving geeks everywhere). The straw that often breaks the camel’s back is Ajax, which partial-page updates are often unnoticable to screen readers and other types of assistive technology.

I’ll post slides after the talk, and will be writing about this with Victor in an upcoming article for our Yahoo! User Interface Blog.



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